• Daniel LaPointe

Friday, February 22


https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=CYB6xxikcx0&app=desktop *Scroll to bottom for 19.1 strategy ACTIVATION 3 Sets, at a very low intensity: :30s Light Row, :30s Light Air Squats, :30s Sit-Ups After the initial, very light sweat, has been broken, complete 2 sets at a slightly higher intensity (but still very controlled): :20s Moderate Row, 5 Wallball Front Squats Rotate through the following stations twice: :30s Active Spidermans :45s Banded Hamstring Distraction (each leg) Into specific movement prep mobility: Banded Ankle Distraction: 45s/Side Place band low on the post and low on the ankle. Step forward to create tension and place foot on a 45# plate. Drive the shin forward while letting the band pull back on the joint. Spend 1 minute on each side. Medicine Ball Squat Hold & Ankle Stretch: 30 Second Hold + 30 Seconds Each Side This is a two part stretch. First part hips, second part ankles. We’re starting with a medicine ball squat hold, using the ball to drive ourselves into the bottom of a squat. Keep the chest high and drive the knees out with the elbows. For part two, lean your weight towards one side of the body to feel a stretch in the calves. 30 second squat hold followed by 30 seconds each side for the ankles. Specific Primer for "Open 19.1" Gradually building to a full intensity round to finish. 2 Rounds: 7 Wallballs, 10/7 Calorie Row Purpose here is to feel through the combination, and to elevate the heart rate. Moderate intensity here, purely feeling through the transitions. Start to rehearse our footwork here between stations. 2 Rounds: 7 Wallballs, 10/7 Calorie Row Same repetition scheme, but now let's bring more intensity. Let's move in the area of where we want to be pacing wise for the workout. Further building on the first 2 rounder, let's continue to dial in our footwork and transitions. 1 Round: 19 Wallballs 19 Calorie Row 5 Wallballs

This round can be modified as seen fit, with the theme being true for all: A rehearsal round intended to capture the feel of the workout. So that we fully recognize the pacing effort, experiencing a single full round, despite the short-term fatigue it can induce, will help us confirm our approach. The final 5 wallballs following gives us the chance to feel the start of "round 2". Following, rest 3:00-5:00, and begin.

Crossfit Games Open 19.1 (Ages 16-54) (AMRAP - Reps)

Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of: 19 wall-ball shots 19-cal. row Men throw 20-lb. ball to 10-ft. target Women throw 14-lb. ball to 9-ft. target

Crossfit Games Open 19.1 Masters (55+) (AMRAP - Reps)

Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of: 19 wall-ball shots 19-cal. row Men throw 20-lb. ball to 9-ft. target Women throw 10-lb. ball to 9-ft. target

Crossfit Games Open 19.1 Scaled (Ages 16-54) (AMRAP - Reps)

Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of: 19 wall-ball shots 19-cal. row Men throw 14-lb. ball to 10-ft. target Women throw 10-lb. ball to 9-ft. target

Crossfit Games Open 19.1 Scaled (Ages 16-54) (AMRAP - Reps)

Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of: 19 wall-ball shots 19-cal. row Men throw 14-lb. ball to 10-ft. target Women throw 10-lb. ball to 9-ft. target

Crossfit Games Open 19.1 Scaled (Ages 16-54) (AMRAP - Reps)

Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of: 19 wall-ball shots 19-cal. row Men throw 14-lb. ball to 10-ft. target Women throw 10-lb. ball to 9-ft. target

Crossfit Games Open 19.1 Masters Scaled (55+) (AMRAP - Reps)

Complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of: 19 wall-ball shots 19-cal. row Men throw 14-lb. ball to 8-ft. target Women throw 10-lb. ball to 8-ft. target

Our different strategy themes are based on the wallball, purely given how this is the only "station" in the workout where we may come to a complete stop. Almost always, our first place in strategy is minimizing the amount of seconds we spend not moving forward. And in this workout, seconds disappear quickly between athletes when one's medicine ball is resting on the ground. Strategy #1 in further detail (1-2+ breaks per round): This is a wallball workout for us. As written above, minimizing the amount of time not moving is our focus. The row is secondary, and is our pacer. A recovery movement here between the wallballs. Given how we will face large breaks if we enter the wallballs heavily fatigued from a push on the row, our aim is to go in the opposite direction. Overly pace the row, so we can push our efforts on the medicine ball. Paces here will naturally vary, but think a mid 900 calories (per hour) for males, and a mid 800's for girls. Strategy #2 in further detail (1 planned, quick break per round): This athlete could do several sets unbroken on the wallball, but it may result in a slower-than-desirable row. And there is a point here where it's actually best to break up the wallballs with a quick, planned break, and push the row. Using the pacing chart at the top of this page as reference, let's talk through an example: 1200 calories/hour... 0:57s 1100 calories/hour... 1:03 1000 calories/hour... 1:10 A "Strategy #2" athlete could complete the wallballs unbroken for at least a handful of rounds, but it would require a heavily paced row (say 1000 would be their average pace). If that athlete moved their row from 1000, to 1200, they would buy themselves 13 seconds per round. In other words, if that single break is 13 seconds or less, the athlete is doing better than they would at the 1000 calorie per hour pace. Naturally, this is highly individual dependent, and somewhat tricky for the athletes in this group. It's an aggressive pace, far

Movement Preparation Next let's look at each movement, the wallball and row, with key points of performance to focus on. Wallballs Efficiency is naturally crucial here. As we can imagine, a small movement flaw here compounds massively over time. And it won't be the first five minutes it shows itself, but rather the back half of the workout. Let's set the tone for the workout in round one, spending due diligence towards our mechanics with the big picture in mind. Start with dialing in our "front rack" position. Key checkpoints: 1) Hands beneath (not outside) 2) Vertical forearms 3) Chin contact Positioning the ball in this fashion creates three points of contact, and a stable base to work with. We are not looking to tuck the ball beneath the chin, but rather just to make contact for balance. This takes some pressure off our hands and shoulders, which would otherwise to the work to stabilize. A common fault here is having our hands to the sides, or allowing our elbows to flare out to the sides. This requires us to "squeeze in" to support the ball, taxing our chest and shoulders unnecessarily. Secondly, let’s focus on what we’re doing in between repetitions. After throwing the ball to the target, let’s avoid leaving the hands in the air. If we do so, we’re again sapping our shoulders unnecessarily. Bring them down to afford ourselves a micro-break between. A little bit goes a long way here. Let’s also apply that same theme to our legs. Commonly we’ll toss the ball, and leave our quads flexed and engaged until we receive it a moment later. As we relax the arms after the toss, actively relax the legs so we can utilize these little micro-breaks between reps.

On the row, let’s first talk about our transitions. Inside this workout, transitions are vital. As we move to the rower, our aim is to simply get the fan moving. After every 19th wallball repetition, let’s be in a rush to get the first pull. To simply get the fan moving. We highly recommend taping the straps on the rower to the point where we can immediately slide in, and out, while still using them as the leverage that they bring. Rower Two focus points: 1) Hip Drive (Posterior chain utilization) 2) Relax on the return Focusing on our hip drive will leverage our posterior chain. When we think about the muscle groups the wallball will tax, the quads are the first to come to mind. It’s an upright torso squat, and quad intensive. On the rower, we would be doing ourselves a favor to use the opposing muscle group as best as possible – the hips and hamstrings. Our posterior chain. A very common fault in the row is the early opening of the hips, which results in the drive being all quads. It’s less powerful, and in combination with the quad-heavy wallballs, a punishing combination. Focus on driving our hips back from the catch, keeping our shoulders in front of our hips just up until our knees are locked out. See the full strategy write-up for more details on these mechanics. The second and final focus point on the rower follows in suit with the final wallball focus. Relax on the return. As we return the catch position on the rower, open the hands to relax the upper torso. Knowing that we’ll need our shoulder capacity on the following set of wallballs, this brief micro-break can go a long way.

With that, all of our key checkpoints apply on the row that we consistently want to think about. Mechanics go a long way here: • Sit tall. Sit on the "sit bones" of your butt, trying to be as tall as you can be. This will put us into an engaged position, versus a "slippery and loose" one that all too often results in a loss of power. • Dial in the catch position. This is the heart of every repetition or stroke. Much like how if we set up incorrectly on the start of a snatch, the catch here determines the trajectory of the stroke. Slide in so that our shin bones are just about vertical, sit tall with a proud chest, and get our shoulders in front of our hips allowing us to reach in, maximizing our stroke length. • Cadence. Stroke rates should be on the lower side inside this workout, allowing us to focus on our breathing during these pulls. The wallball tends to elevate our heart rate more than the rower, and is more challenging to breath under (loading is always more challenging than unloaded, even if just a wallball). Although there is no specific ideal "number" (as it varies based on height), males will likely find an ideal stroke rate somewhere between 27-30 SPM(strokes per minute), and females between 30-33. Quality over quantity here.

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